The Politics of Prisoner Abuse: The United States and Enemy Prisoners after 9/11

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When states are threatened by war and terrorism, can we really expect them to abide by human rights and humanitarian law? David P. Forsythe’s bold analysis of US policies towards terror suspects after 9/11 addresses this issue directly. Covering moral, political, and legal aspects, he examines the abuse of enemy detainees at the hands of the United States. At the center of the debate is the Bush Administration, which Forsythe argues displayed disdain for international law, in contrast to the general public’s support for humanitarian affairs. Forsythe explores the similarities and differences between Presidents Obama and Bush on the question of prisoner treatment in an age of terrorism and asks how the Administration should proceed. The book traces the Pentagon’s and CIA’s records in mistreating prisoners, providing an account which will be of interest to all those who value human rights and humanitarian law.

Review
“This important book details the massive abuse of human rights of US prisoners since 9/11. It is up to date as of July 2010, thus covering the problematic actions of the Obama Administration as well as that of George W. Bush. In a form accessible to scholars, students, and the general public, Dr Forsythe’s careful research and analysis underscore how fragile human rights become when national security seems to be at stake.”
– Rhoda E. Howard-Hassmann, Canada Research Chair in International Human Rights, Wilfrid Laurier University

“Forsythe’s encyclopedic chronicle of America’s descent to the dark side capably tackles the tough question: What are the wages of American exceptionalism?”
– Gabor Rona, International Legal Director, Human Rights First, New York –This text refers to the paperback edition.
Book Description
A bold critique of US policies towards terror suspects after 9/11, which will interest all those who value human rights and humanitarian law. –This text refers to the paperback edition.
About the Author
David Forsythe is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. He has been a visiting professor at universities in Geneva and Utrecht and in 2008 he held the Fulbright Distinguished Research Chair of Human Rights and International Studies at the Danish Institute of International Studies, Copenhagen. He has also been on staff for the United Nations University in Tokyo and has been a consultant to both the UN Office of the High Commissioner of Refugees and the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. –This text refers to the paperback edition.
Book Description
When states are threatened by war and terrorism, can we really expect them to abide by human rights and humanitarian law? David Forsythe’s book is a bold critique of US policies towards terror suspects after 9/11, providing an account which will interest all those who value human rights and humanitarian law. –This text refers to the printed_access_code edition.

Product Key Features
Format Trade Paperback
Language English
Topic Terrorism, International Relations / General
Publication Year 2011
Number of Pages 334 Pages

Dimensions
Item Length 9in.
Item Height 0.6in.
Item Width 6in.
Item Weight 18.4 Oz

Author David P. Forsythe
Table of Content 1. Prisoner abuse and political morality in historical perspective; 2. Political morality and the Bush Administration; 3. Bush lawyers: the politics of legal interpretation; 4. The military: Afghanistan, Guantánamo, Iraq; 5. The CIA: kidnapping, Black Sites, extraordinary rendition; 6. Due process: detention classification, Military Commissions; 7. Prisoner abuse and the politics of transnational justice.
Copyright Date 2011
Target Audience Scholarly & Professional
Dewey Decimal 355.1/296
Dewey Edition 22
Illustrated Yes
Genre Political Science

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